Women and Girls’ Opportunity Agenda

The following is the list of bills recommended by various commissioners, legislative offices, and the CCSWG staff for 2021.  This year, the Commission is focused on aiding women’s overall recovery from the COVID-19 impacts, which affected women and girls at all ages and particularly negatively impacted women and girls of color.  

Policy Pillar #1: Economic Security

The Commission pillar of Economic Security helps women return to the workforce with protections and flexibilities that lifts women and girls out of poverty and provide opportunities and a robust care infrastructure for success. This includes:

  • Improve access high-quality, affordable childcare and education
  • Support flexible family-friendly workplaces, including comprehensive paid family, medical and sick leave
  • Ensure fair and equitable pay and job opportunities
  • Build and sustain strong safety net support systems
  • Strengthen and enforce protections against discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, which are especially important to ensure women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities are treated equally and fairly in the workplace

Policy Pillar #2: Women and Girls’ Wellness

The pandemic has further entrenched the health and safety inequalities faced by women, especially women of color. The Commission is working towards ensuring women and girls can live happier, longer, and healthier lives by addressing the growing disparities in health equity and safety.

  • Accessibility, Availability, Affordability to Care and Preventative Care, including Mental and Behavioral Health
  • Reproductive Health and Justice
  • Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Prevention and Support

Policy Pillar #3: Equity and Justice

As we advance our mission of improving the lives of women and girls, we adopt and support intersectional, equitable measures that value all lives and experiences, especially women and girls of color. The Commission strives to eliminate disparities for vulnerable women and girls, regardless of their age, race, color, creed, abilities, socio-economic status, immigration status, sexual orientation, or gender identity at birth.

  • Gender and racial wealth gap
  • Gender and racial parity in leadership roles
  • Strengthen and enforce protections against discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, which are especially important to ensure women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities are treated equally and fairly in the workplace

AB 1287 – Eliminate the “Pink Tax”

Title VII of the Civil Rights act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity. However, women still pay more on average for identical products that are marketed specifically to women, and often are simply a different color – a phenomena known as the “Pink Tax.” Women make up as much as 85% of consumer purchases in the United States. Unequal prices for women translate to impacts for their own financial wellbeing as well as that of their families. AB 1287 prohibits businesses from assigning different prices for identical goods simply because of the gender the goods are marketed to.

Help Us End Discriminatory Taxes

AB 1287 prohibits businesses from assigning different prices for identical goods simply because of the gender the goods are marketed to. In order to price products differently, a business would have to prove there was substantial difference in the time or cost of production. If the business was found to have assigned a price based solely on the gender of the intended consumer, the business would be fined increasing amounts for each violation.

Eliminating the Pink Tax eliminates one more barrier to gender equality. Compounded by the gender pay gap, arbitrary price differences are unjust and harmful. Women should be able to exercise their buying power without the fear of gender-based discrimination.

Policy In A Pandemic

The Urgent Challenges of Covid-19

The Covid-19 health and economic crisis affected all Californians, but women and women of color have been hit especially hard.  According to a recent study by the California Budget and Policy Center:

  • Many women of color in California are struggling to get by during Covid-19 with nearly 50% of Black and Latinx households surveyed reported difficulty paying for usual expenses such as food, utilities, clothing and rent.
  • With the added economic and health challenges the pandemic forced upon women and women of color, 47% California women reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, which 7 out of 10 respondents are women of color.
  • More than 6 in 10 Latinx and Black women in California live in households that lost earnings during the pandemic.

A year ago, U.S. women outnumbered men in the workforce, but just this December, they accounted for100% of jobs lost in the workforce according to the U.S. Department of Labor. 

  • When broken down by race, Latina and Black women experienced unemployment levels that were higher than women’s overall unemployment rate of 6.3%. 
  • Last month, 9.1% of Latinas and 8.4% of Black women were unemployed, compared to 5.7% of White women and 5.8% of White men.  

CCSWG Advocacy Archives

Click the button below to find previous policy and legislation efforts supported and/or sponsored by the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls.

Capitol

Location

1925 L Street, Ste. 345
Sacramento, CA 95814